It's officially the time of year where we all start reflecting on all the experiences we lived through in the last 365 days. The good, the bad, the ugly, it's now time to remember, and perhaps learn from them all.

For my family, 2021 was a stressful, but happy year of new beginnings. We moved into a new home, we got a new puppy, my daughters started a new school, and we got to make a lot of 'first' memories.

I think most of us would agree 2021 will not go down as the best year in history, but it certainly had its memorable moments. Here's one cool thing I found today during my trip down memory lane, a fascinating video from Eyewitness News Morning Meteorologist Joey Marino, who also happens to be an avid storm chaser. I think what I like most about the video is that Joey has footage from some of the most impactful storms that hit the Midwest in 2021. From Kansas and Iowa to Illinois and Wisconsin, 2021 sure had its share of powerful and scary weather moments.

Joey Marino via Facebook
Joey Marino via Facebook
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(Click here to watch the video now.)

Now, I'm not sure of the exact dates for when Joey Marino caught most of the footage for that video, but I'm guessing a lot of it came from the week of June 14, 2021, when the Midwest experienced 6 massive and destructive storms all in a few days time. (Read more about that, here).

As you prepare for the year ahead, perhaps it's a good idea to invest in a weather radio...just in case.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

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