Although spray sunscreen is convenient, it can do more harm than help when it comes to your child's health.

I'm extremely fair and sunscreen is something I use almost daily. I have to. Almost every single product I use, lotion, makeup, etc has some sort of SPF in it. I don't want to burn.

One of the most convenient products I use is a spray sunscreen. It's great for me to reach my own back, spray my face and easy to use on my niece and nephews. Turns out the FDA says it does more harm than good.

Fox17Online reports that the FDA announced in 2014 that they are investigating the potential risks of spray sunscreens.

It is believed that the chemicals used in spray sunscreens can result in very harmful situations, even death if swallowed or inhaled.

Don't spray children with sunscreen
George Doyle
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It is quite difficult for children to hold their breath while you are spraying. Sometimes they may open their mouths and talk while you are spraying the sunscreen on them. You can even read the back of the cans to see a warning that says to get medical help if swallowed or inhaled.

Consumer Reports says if you are going to use the spray sunscreen, there are measures you can take to make sure your children are safe:

• Don’t use sprays on children, unless you have no other product available. In that case, spray the sunscreen onto your hands and rub it on. As with all sunscreens, be especially careful on the face, avoiding the eyes and mouth.

• Adults can still use sprays—but don’t spray your face. Instead, spray on your hands and rub it on, making sure to avoid your eyes and mouth. And try to avoid inhaling it.

• Make sure you apply enough. Our tests have found that sprays can work well when used properly—but it is harder to make sure that you apply enough, especially when it’s windy. We recommend spraying as much as can be evenly applied, and then repeating, just to be safe. On windy days, you might want to spray the sunscreen on your hands and rub it on.

 

The information makes sense to me and I can see the point taken. Looks as if I'll have to be more careful spraying the sunscreen in the future.