The information in this article will not pertain to all readers but it is definitely worth noting.

President Joe Biden kicked out another COVID-19 stimulus package and, to no surprise, the Internal Revenue Service might have sent the money to individuals who do not actually qualify for it. The qualifications go deeper than the level of income and are related to citizenship, according to FOX 32 in Chicago. The explanation, though, is a little confusing. The Chicago news outlet says some nonalien residents may have inadvertently received a stimulus payment but should not have.

Generally, a 'nonresident alien' is not a U.S. citizen, doesn't have a green card, and is not physically present in the U.S. for the required amount of time. On the other hand, a person who's a qualifying resident alien in 2021 is eligible for a third stimulus payment if he or she has a valid Social Security number and isn't claimed as a dependent someone else's tax return.

While you sort through that explanation in your head, here is how to send back the payment if you know you shouldn't have received it or do not want to it, according to FOX 32.

If you opened a piece of mail of felt like you hit the jackpot by finding a pre-loaded stimulus debit card,

Send the card with a note that you don’t want the money to Money Network Cardholder Services, 2900 Westside Parkway, Alpharetta, GA 30004.

If you woke up and there was a surprise waiting for you in your checking account,

You’ll need to void the check and send it back to one of the IRS addresses listed on this page.

Or, maybe you received an archaic piece of paper known as a "check",

Send a check payable to the US Treasury, include "Third EIP" and your taxpayer ID number somewhere on the check, and include a brief explanation of why you’re sending it back.

Or, piggy-packing off a suggestion by FOX 32, if you qualified for the stimulus payment and do not want it, you could donate it to a great charity like St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

LOOK: Here are the 25 best places to live in Illinois

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JB Love is ½ of  Q98.5's Lil Zim & JB In The Morning, weekday mornings from 5:00 a.m. to 10 a.m. Follow him on Twitter, Instagram.

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