If your teen is asking for a phone this Christmas just be aware that they could be using this secret language to communicate with their friends.

The same can be said if your teen already has a smartphone. Teens are always on their phones too, well let's be honest, that could be said for adults too.

But teens are using social media as a way to keep in contact with their friends and sometimes strangers.

And they're not just using words to have a conversation either. They're also using emojis and acronyms, some of which could be coded.

We live in a world where sex trafficking is a very real and scary threat, so parents you might want to educate yourselves on just what some of these acronyms are your kids are using.

According to a recent article on MyStateline.com, these are some of the popular terms parents be concerned about:

  • IWSN - I want sex now
  • 99 - code for parents are gone
  • KMS - Kill Myself
  • LMIR - Let's meet in real life
  • WTTP - Want to trade photos
  • MOS - Mom over the shoulder
  • GNOC - Get naked on camera

Child therapist Lauren Self says she finds parents in her office after discovering this sort of behavior on their child's phone.

Her advise:

"Be calm. One of the biggest things I hear from teenagers and adolescence is 'my parents freaked out,' and then after that they stopped talking to them,"

Going on to say that parents should set boundaries:

"Some parents will have them turn it in an hour before bed and will kind of go through it. Some parents, as soon as they get the phone will discuss a contract, 'Okay this is what you're allowed to do, this is what you're not allowed to do, this is when you have to turn it in.' They make it very clear and concise and it's very helpful."

Educating yourself on the apps your kids are using is also helpful.

Kids should know that "stranger danger" can also exist in the virtual world too.

No, you shouldn't take all of your teen's privacy away, but being aware and keeping them safe is your main job as their parent.