As if all the flooding weren't enough, the Rock County Health Department says that high levels of the bacteria make parts of the Rock "unsuitable for recreation."

With "no-wake zones" being declared up and down the Rock River, boating, swimming, and water-skiing are probably not at the top of your to-do list. And, according to readings shared by the Rock County Health Department, that's probably a good thing.

High levels of  e. coli bacteria found in surface water sampling done by the RCHD show that Traxler Park on the Rock River has totals that register at a level that constitute a "licensed beach closed condition."

Samples at several other locations, including Beloit Lagoon, Badfish Creek, Marsh Creek, Bass Creek, Turtle Creek and Lake Leota also show high results for e. coli.

E. coli bacteria occur naturally in surface water, however, as levels increase, there is an increased risk of human and pet illness due to recreational activities when water can become ingested. Recent rainfall, as well as land runoff, can affect E. coli levels in water testing results, especially during flooding.

As I mentioned earlier, we've got enough on our hands right now with flood conditions, but this may have an effect on water activities on the Rock as the summer continues.